Packaging status of cool drinks in Japan

2022-10-01
  • Detail

Packaging status of cool drinks in Japan

in Japan, the so-called cool drinks refer to drinks that do not contain lactic acid bacteria, milk and dairy products with an alcohol content of less than 1%, including vegetable drinks such as tomato juice, fruit juice drinks, cola carbonated drinks, coffee drinks, tea drinks, mineral water, soda water, soybean milk, sports drinks and health drinks. There are many kinds of cool drinks in Japan, and the output is also large. The output of cool drinks in Japan increased rapidly from the 1960s to 1990s. The output exceeded 1billion liters in 1964, 2billion liters in 1967, 5billion liters in 1977, 10billion liters in 1990, 15billion liters in 1999, 17billion liters in 2005 and 18.5 billion liters in 2007. The per capita consumption of cool drinks in Japan is considerable, with more than 140 liters in 2007

tea beverage is a beverage that has developed very rapidly in recent years, and has become the largest variety of cool drinks in Japan. In the early 1990s, ITO Park Company of Japan was very committed to promoting the technological development of the experimental machine industry; After the successful development of canned oolong tea, large beverage manufacturers including Asahi and Coca Cola from Japan soon entered the production of tea beverages. Tea drinks have achieved great development in Japan, and its growth rate is unmatched by other drinks. From 1995 to 1998, the average annual growth rate of Japanese tea beverage production was as high as 21%. In 1997, 1998 and 1999, the output of tea and beverage in Japan was 3.87 million KL, 3.99 million KL and 4.06 million KL respectively, increased to 4.38 million KL in 2000, 5.58 million KL in 2005, and increased to 6.0 million KL and 6.2 million KL in 2007 and 2008 respectively. Japanese tea drinks mainly include five kinds of tea drinks, namely green tea drinks, oolong tea drinks, black tea drinks, mixed tea drinks and wheat tea drinks

coffee drinks were only introduced in the Japanese market in 1960. At first, the growth was quite slow, and by 1975, the output was only 130000 KL. Since the 1960s, due to the advent of the vending machine that can heat coffee cans, it can easily make people drink a cup of hot coffee quickly next to the vending machine, and the output of coffee drinks has increased rapidly. Since 1997, the output of coffee drinks has continued to increase at a rate of about 100000 KL per year. By 1990, the output of coffee drinks had reached 2.3 million KL, increased to 2.6 million K in 2000, and required 150000 to 180000 tons of phosphorous graphite L. in 2005, it was 2.9 million KL (Accounting for 16% of the total output of cool drinks in Japan). In 2007 and 2008, it was about 3.33 million KL. Since 2001, the output of coffee drinks has exceeded that of carbonated drinks, and is the second largest beverage in Japan, which is only less than that of tea drinks

carbonated beverages have accounted for half of the cool beverage market in Japan for a long time. In 1977, the output of carbonated beverages in Japan reached 2.8 million KL, accounting for 55% of the total output of cool beverages that year. In 1988, the output of carbonated beverages in Japan was 3.4 million KL, the highest ever recorded. Since then, the output of carbonated beverages in Japan has declined, falling to 2.8 million KL in 2000 and 3.2 million KL in 2007. Cola beverages account for the largest proportion of carbonated beverages. The output of cola beverages in Japan was 1million KL in 2006, increased to 1.15 million KL in 2007 and 1.25 million KL in 2008

the output of fruit beverage in Japan also increased rapidly, exceeding 100000 KL in 1955, 200000 KL in 1958, 300000 KL in 1961, 1million KL in 1975, 2million KL in 1986 and 2.6 million KL in 1990, which is the highest production record in history. The output of fruit beverage in Japan was 1.83 million KL in 2005 (accounting for 10% of the total output), and 2.1 million KL in 2007

although sports drinks were first introduced in the United States, they have achieved faster and greater development in Japan. Sports drink refers to a drink added with electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and a small amount of sugar, vitamins and other ingredients. After exercise, people drink sports drinks containing an appropriate amount of sugar and electrolytes, which can be quickly absorbed by the body, quench thirst and even disintegrate thirst, so that the body can reach a balanced state. Since 1980, Japan's sports drinks have grown rapidly, with an output of 310000 KL in 1985, more than 1million KL in 1996, nearly 1.4 million KL in 2000, more than 500000 KL in 2001, 1.65 million KL in 2005 and 1.9 million KL in 2007

mineral water and bottled water have also increased significantly in Japan for many years, from 450000 KL in 1995 to 650000 KL in 1997, 960000 KL in 1999 and 1.02 million KL in 2001, 1.3 million KL in 2004, 1.43 million KL in 2005 (accounting for 8% of the total output), and 1.9 million KL in 2007. Japan also imports a large amount of mineral water, with an annual import volume of hundreds of thousands of KL. After adding the imported products, the consumption of mineral water in Japan has exceeded 2million KL

Japanese fruit drinks are divided into two parts, one is fruit juice (pure fruit juice) and the other is fruit juice drinks (pure fruit juice content exceeds 10%). The output of pure fruit juice was 580000 KL in 2001, fell sharply to 470000 KL in 2003, increased to 560000 KL in 2005 and 580000 KL in 2007, rising to the level of 2001. The output of other fruit drinks (mainly fruit juice drinks) was 1.2 million KL in 2001, and has been reduced continuously since then. In 2003, 2005 and 2007, it was reduced to 860000 KL, 810000 KL and 780000 KL respectively

judging from the four main packages of cool drinks, the metal cans of cool drinks, which accounted for more than 60% in the early 1990s, have now fallen to only 20%. The proportion of PET bottles of cool drinks in the total volume has changed on the contrary, from 20% in the past to more than 60% now. Glass bottles of cool drinks are declining, and paper containers of cool drinks are rising slightly

pet bottled cool drinks accounted for less than 20% of the total output of cool drinks in Japan in 1990, increased to 25% in 1996, increased to 32% in 1997, increased to 42% in 1999, increased to 51% in 2001, increased to 60% in 2004, decreased by 18.43% year-on-year in 2007, and increased to 63% in 1997. From 1995 to 2007, the output of PET bottles of tea drinks in Japan increased from 34% to 84%, the output of PET bottles of carbonated beverages increased from 28% to 61%, the output of PET bottles of mineral water increased from 76% to 92%, the output of PET bottles of sports drinks increased from 33% to 90%, and the output of PET bottles of vegetable beverages increased from 5% to 34%, The proportion of PET bottle fruit beverage production in the total fruit beverage increased from 21% to 48%, the proportion of PET bottle coffee beverage production in the total coffee beverage increased from 3% to 16%, and the proportion of PET bottle milk beverage production in the total milk beverage increased from 7% to 44%. The consumption of PET resin for bottle making in Japan exceeded 50000 tons in 1985, 100000 tons in 1989, 200000 tons in 1996, 300000 tons in 1998, 400000 tons in 2000, 500000 tons in 2004, 577000 tons in 2006, 600000 tons in 2007 and 602000 tons in 2008. Among them, the output of PET bottles for cool drinks was less than 200000 tons in 1997, increased to 310000 tons in 1999, 380000 tons in 2001, 410000 tons in 2003, 510000 tons in 2005 and 515000 tons in 2006. In 2008, the output of cool beverage bottles in Japan was 533000 tons, accounting for 89% of the total PET bottle output in Japan

the proportion of the output of metal cans of cool drinks in the total output of cool drinks in Japan was still 60% in 1990, which fell to 58% in 1993, 47% in 1998, 38% in 2000, 27% in 2003, 24% in 2005 and 21% in 2007. The canned proportion of coffee drinks is the highest among all kinds of beverages, which was 92% in 1995 (including 91% in iron cans and 1% in aluminum cans), and decreased to 70% in 2007 (including 66% in iron cans and 4% in aluminum cans). The output of carbonated beverages in metal cans accounted for 49% of the total output of carbonated beverages in Japan in 1995 (including 23.4% in aluminum cans and 25.1% in tin cans), and decreased to 29% in 2007 (including 26% in aluminum cans and 3.3% in tin cans) The output of metal cans of fruit drinks accounted for 27% of the total output of fruit drinks in Japan in 1995 (including 14% aluminum cans and 23% tin cans), and fell to 15% in 2007 (including 9% aluminum cans and 7% tin cans) The output of metal cans of tea drinks accounted for 62% of the total output of Japanese tea drinks in 1995 (including 6% of aluminum cans and 56% of iron cans), and decreased to 7% in 2007 (including 4% of aluminum cans and 3% of iron cans) The output of mineral water in metal cans accounted for 1% of the total output of mineral water in Japan in 1995 and fell to zero in 2007. The output of metal cans of vegetable drinks accounted for 77% of the total output of vegetable drinks in Japan in 1995 (all tin cans), which fell to 12% in 2007 (11.6% of tin cans). The output of metal cans of sports drinks accounted for 57% of the total output of sports drinks in Japan in 1995 (48% of aluminum cans and 9% of iron cans), and fell to 9% in 2007 (almost all aluminum cans). The output of milk beverage in metal cans accounted for 9% of the total output of milk beverage in Japan in 1995 (4% in aluminum cans and 5% in tin cans), and 13% in 2007 (5% in aluminum cans and 8% in tin cans). The output of metal cans for cool drinks in Japan has been decreasing in recent years. In 2000, the output was more than 23 billion, reduced to 18.8 billion in 2005 and 18billion in 2007, including 12.8 billion tin cans and 5.2 billion aluminum cans

the proportion of the output of glass bottle cool drinks in the total output of all cool drinks in Japan has fallen continuously for many years. Global vanadium consumption decreased from 82299 tons (V) in 192016 to 7% in 1995, 4% in 2000, 2% in 2005 and 2% in 2007. The proportion of all kinds of glass bottles of cool drinks has fallen sharply. For example, milk drinks decreased from 43% in 1995 to 5% in 2005, carbonated drinks decreased from 24% to 9%, mineral water decreased from 14% to less than 1%, and fruit drinks decreased from 16% to 2%. The output and output value of Japanese glass bottles were the highest in the early 1990s. In 1991 and 1994, the output value of glass packaging containers in Japan was more than 250 billion yen, and the output was more than 2.4 million tons. Since then, the output value and output have been declining. In 1998, the output value fell to less than 200billion yen, in 2000 to less than 190billion yen, in 2005 to less than 150billion yen, in 2006 to less than 140billion yen, and in 2007 to 137.7 billion yen, including 14.6 billion yen for cool drink bottles. The output of glass bottles fell to less than 2million tons in 1999, 1.9 million tons in 2000, 1.52 million tons in 2005, 1.47 million tons in 2006, and 1.43 million tons in 2007, including 200000 tons of cool beverage bottles

the proportion of the output of paper container cool drinks in the total output of all cool drinks in Japan has increased. It was 7% and 6% respectively in 1993 and 1994, increased to 10% from 1995 to 2004 and 12% from 2005 to 2007. Beverages with a high proportion of paper containers (2007) include vegetable beverages, 54%, fruit beverages, 37%, milk beverages, 36%, tea beverages, 9% and coffee beverages, 8%. The highest proportion of paper containers is milk and processed milk other than cool drinks, with the proportion of paper containers up to 85%. For example, it was 86% in 2000, 2002 and 2006, and 84.5% in 2004. In 2007, the output of milk and processed milk in Japan was 4.03 billion liters, of which 3.46 billion liters were packaged in paper containers, accounting for 85.8% of the total output. Glass bottle packaging is 330million liters, accounting for 8.2%

Copyright © 2011 JIN SHI